Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

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Product Description

Interior designer and artist Ashley Hicks presents his photographs and description of the interior design of Buckingham Palace, home of Britain''s royal family since 1837. An important representation of Regency, Victorian, and Edwardian styles, the palace is the work of such noted architects as John Nash and Sir Aston Webb. Hicks records the formal spaces with vibrancy, capturing the magnificent rooms furnished with treasures from the Royal Collection.

Starting at the Grand Staircase, Hicks leads us through the state rooms, which include the White Drawing Room and the Blue Drawing Room that both overlook the palace gardens; the Ballroom, which is the setting for twenty investiture ceremonies each year; and the Throne Room, used by Queen Victoria for spectacular costume balls in the 1840s. The long, skylit Picture Gallery is hung with important works of art from the Royal Collection by Rembrandt van Rijn, Peter Paul Rubens, Nicolas Poussin, Anthony van Dyck, Johannes Vermeer, and Canaletto, among others. Decorative furnishings from George IV''s exotic Brighton Pavilion lend a fanciful turn to many of the rooms.

Review

"We’ve seen a lot of the exterior of Buckingham Palace, from Queen Elizabeth’s addresses to various royal baby announcements, but rarely do we get such an intimate look at its interiors. Designer Ashley Hicks takes us inside the palace for a look at where we get a tour of the truly sumptuous rooms (the White Drawing Room, the Throne Room, the Picture Gallery) in Regency, Victorian, and Edwardian styles that span the monarchs." — New York Magazine 

"Royal watchers, history buffs and interior design aficionados alike will enjoy this look at the iconic home of Britain’s royal family. Interior designer Ashley Hicks (a grandson of Lord Mountbatten and brother of  lifestyle entrepreneur India Hicks, who was a bridesmaid at the wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana) presents his own photographs of the castle’s staterooms, hallways and galleries, and describes the décor and the esteemed history of each. This lavish volume underscores the magnificence of these spaces and provides a strong measure of majesty for readers (especially those who, like me, are anxiously waiting for Season 3 of The Crown to air)." — Design NJ

"Art publishing in 2018 produced a variety of interesting possibilities for the art lover on your Christmas list. Any fan of the British royal family will love Buckingham Palace" — Marina Times 

About the Author

Ashley Hicks is a British author, architect, interior and furniture designer, and photographer. He is the son of Lady Pamela Hicks and the legendary decorator David Hicks.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
270 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

jimbiz
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Annoying photographs
Reviewed in the United States on December 5, 2020
While some of the photographs in this book do great justice to the interior of this palace, a large number of these photographs cut off what ever they are portraying - for example, the photograph of a vase on p. 54 is off center and and doesn''t'' show the left part of the... See more
While some of the photographs in this book do great justice to the interior of this palace, a large number of these photographs cut off what ever they are portraying - for example, the photograph of a vase on p. 54 is off center and and doesn''t'' show the left part of the vase; too many photographs are of objects so up close the photograph loses all context; practically every photograph of a painting has some part of the painting cut off and missing. Churchill famously said that he read only for profit or pleasure; to me these weird photographs are annoying and not at all a pleasure to view. Back to Amazon you go!
9 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Historical & Beautiful
Reviewed in the United States on September 26, 2018
This is one of the most beautiful books in my historical laibrary. I wish the auther told more on some of the wonderful furniture shown. The photos are just fabulous.
14 people found this helpful
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Twitter Fingers.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Exceptional
Reviewed in the United States on October 14, 2018
Best photography I’ve seen of the Palace interiors, with very informative text. Superb book.
10 people found this helpful
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Bluz
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Artsy Photos
Reviewed in the United States on August 20, 2021
I liked the balance of text & photos, which was mostly large photos with just a little bit of description. The pictures are big and the quality of the printed photos was good. However, I did not care for the photographer''s style, which I call "Artsy". Quite a few images... See more
I liked the balance of text & photos, which was mostly large photos with just a little bit of description. The pictures are big and the quality of the printed photos was good. However, I did not care for the photographer''s style, which I call "Artsy". Quite a few images have "off center" subjects & numerous images have such shallow Depth of Field, that only a small portion of the image was actually in focus. There was a picture of a famous Sevres vase that was so far off center that the the entire vase wasn''t even in the image; it was partially chopped off. Yikes!!

The purpose of photos of a palace interior isn''t to create artsy images for an art gallery; it is to record the reality of the architecture & furnishings. I was somewhat disappointed.
2 people found this helpful
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pak
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not the greatest
Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2020
I was disappointed that there wasn''t more photos of the workings of the palace. I understand that the Queen restricted where photographer could go but wanted to see more. Strictly museum photos.
4 people found this helpful
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Kelli Mitchell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is just royally wonderful!
Reviewed in the United States on September 7, 2019
First off, this book is one that needs to be judged by its'' cover as it is exquisite and just a gorgeous book. It is large and perfect as a coffee table book. The contents of the book are just as wonderful. Such a beautiful thorough book. Highly pleased. I''ve been showing... See more
First off, this book is one that needs to be judged by its'' cover as it is exquisite and just a gorgeous book. It is large and perfect as a coffee table book. The contents of the book are just as wonderful. Such a beautiful thorough book. Highly pleased. I''ve been showing it off.
3 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Crown fans this is for you!
Reviewed in the United States on January 12, 2019
I purchased this as a Christmas gift.
It was a total hit! It''s a detailed book about Buckingham Palace. I read an article that suggested if you know a fan of the Netflix show, The Crown they would love this.
Well, I knew a fan and they did LOVE it!
4 people found this helpful
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Dan C
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Photos are spectacular.
Reviewed in the United States on November 28, 2018
This is an awesome book. I love that there is a bit of history to go along with the stunning photos. Makes me want to go to London to see for myself.
5 people found this helpful
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Stephen Bentley
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Is it the book or the Palace?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 19, 2019
George IV and Edward VII, between them the greatest Royal Impresarios since Charles I. It has to be said that none of the three had exactly spotless reputations. I think that of the three, George, though Regent St, Regent''s Park, National Gallery & the outline of Windsor...See more
George IV and Edward VII, between them the greatest Royal Impresarios since Charles I. It has to be said that none of the three had exactly spotless reputations. I think that of the three, George, though Regent St, Regent''s Park, National Gallery & the outline of Windsor Castle are contrary examples; really created albeit on a staggering scale what were in the main intended by him to be private, fantasy spaces. He never saw a finished Buckingham Palace. Royal Lodge was largely demolished after his death, he hadn''t spent much time in his Pavilion in his final years. Windsor & Buckingham Palace are really what we have left. Buckingham Palace was substantially altered by Victoria & Albert - Edward who, as he put it, "I don''t know much about art, but I do know about arrangements," swiftly arranged most of his father''s decorative schemes out of existence replacing them with gilded mirrors, gilding and white gloss. Not forgetting vast floral displays, more bathrooms, electric light & motor cars. I think what we have here is largely Edward VII''s setting for the monarchy. The Pictures, some individual pieces of furniture & sculpture (Canova, not the simpering Victorian crap) are spectacular but the overall decorative effect is Louis the Umpteenth "Ritz". You either like it or you don''t. If you don''t like it, then that''s hardly the fault of this book. I''m not sure if it''s the overall light levels or photographers taste but the old homestead does look ever so slightly run down and gloomy, not to say clapped out. The Throne Room in particular looks like a dismal hotel reception room full of knackered old Thrones inadequately protected from moth. Not the fault of the book. Either maintain the hideosity''s properly or chuck the old rubbish out.
5 people found this helpful
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Multrus
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Curate''s Egg of Usefulness and Disappointment
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 24, 2020
This wonderful photographic book on the interiors of Buckingham Palace is, apart from being surprisingly up-to-date in its slender scholarship on the history of the building''s interiors, is also a supreme disappointment. That may sound oxymoronic, but the reader should...See more
This wonderful photographic book on the interiors of Buckingham Palace is, apart from being surprisingly up-to-date in its slender scholarship on the history of the building''s interiors, is also a supreme disappointment. That may sound oxymoronic, but the reader should consider what we do not get. Hicks uses the opportunity of his connections as a cousin to the Prince of Wales to take some great photographs, though angles and cut off pictures can begin to become a mannerism in his technique, but he really only gives us a glimpse of two interiors that have not been photographed for decades, like the so-called Household Corridor on the south side of the Quadrangle, and the Royal Closet just off the Minister''s Staircase. In 1931, Clifford Smith published a magisterial volume on the palace that is still useful, and bothered to get photographed or describe many rooms that have never been photographed since. In 1968 John Harris added a small number of detail photographs of areas of the palace that are rarely seen too. So what the Twenty First century reader gets is only what one suspects the RoyalCollection, Master of the Household and security officers are prepared to let us have and this is very disappointing. There are interiors that Hicks should gave photographed like the Kings Waiting Room and the corridors with Nash vaulting, the rooms that comprise the Belgian suite, the small Chinese Room behind the Chinese Luncheon Room, and bedrooms and so on that were once along the Principal Corridor. It would not have gone amiss to have included the Audience Chamber where the Queen meets her Prime Ministers, and indeed to have included perhaps glimpses of a couple of rooms that the Queen and Prince Philip occupy which were photographed for Queen Victoria and Edward VII. These all have interesting decoration, Nash ceilings etc, and deserve to be documented even if only briefly with photographs or small details. Hicks surely could have persuaded the Queen that he be allowed to photograph areas of the palace the public are never likely to visit. The other frustration with the book is the idea that Edward VII somewhat spoiled the Victorian polychrome work when he ordered a complete redecoration of the palace in 1902. No account is made of two issues with this. First the palace had barely been occupied for forty years after Prince Albert''s death, and second, the only way in which Edward VII could persuade Queen Alexandra to leave Marlborough House was to allow her to choose the new decorative schemes in the whole of Buckingham palace which was gloomy and dirty and filled with hideous tartan everywhere. Modernization was required and a new White and gold Georgian style was freshly appropriate for rooms used by a King Emperor who was sociable and had a glittering court. These changes were far less jarring than Ludwig Gruner''s Victorian polychrome, and gave a dignity and splendor to the Nash/Pennethorne rooms. The Blore wing we see today feels shoddy and inferior compared with the Nash wing and is largely only made interesting by the furniture and fittings from the Royal Pavilion in Brighton which Queen Victoria largely destroyed to save money building the East Wing; at least Hicks recognizes this and his photographs linger on some of George IV''s great treasures for that building - though again had he entered and photographed other rooms he would certainly have noted other fireplaces and decorative objects and furnishings from the Pavilion. Can we but hope that, with this criticism of the book in mind, Mr Hicks returns to the task and photographs some of the hidden and little seen areas and objects in Buckingham Palace?
3 people found this helpful
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One Man Writes
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What a lot of white and gold
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 20, 2018
The place is indigestably over-laden with treasures and gilding, but this book gives a fascinating glimpse of what it was before Edward VII got loose with the gold spray can.
5 people found this helpful
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L. Matusevics
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best book about Buckingham palace
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 10, 2018
It is absolutely fantastic book about Buckingham palace interiors. Full of color photographs with a description of the interiors of grand state apartments and some hidden for public rooms. Really enjoyed when I''ve got it.
6 people found this helpful
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Christine HAerra
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
To little information
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 3, 2019
Thought I would see more interesting interiors. I like the angles, but only pictures from halls etc. Not to jucy;-)
2 people found this helpful
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Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

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Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale

Buckingham high quality high quality Palace: The Interiors sale